Paul’s Puzzles this week are:

Either

Do I really understand what is causing the forest fires in Australia? Don’t such events show human beings are much weaker than they think, even with their computers and i-phones and missiles?

Or

Given what is happening in the US, Iran and Australia and Syria, is it really worthwhile to spend time talking about Harry & Megan?

Or

Does my son’s pet hamster get ‘bored’ running around its running wheel? How do we really know what an animal is feeling inside? Are cats or foxes genuinely ‘cunning’ or ‘sly’ or is that us just projecting on to them?

Or

Why do we see so many images and figures in clouds or wood fires? Aren’t both, with dreams, the best free cinema life graces us with?

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I am the daughter of Earth and Water,
And the nursling of the Sky;
I pass through the pores of the ocean and shores;
I change, but I cannot die.
For after the rain when with never a stain
The pavilion of Heaven is bare,
And the winds and sunbeams with their convex gleams
Build up the blue dome of air,
I silently laugh at my own cenotaph,
And out of the caverns of rain,
Like a child from the womb, like a ghost from the tomb,
I arise and unbuild it again.

The Cloud Percy Bysshe Shelley

The lamps now glitter down the street;
Faintly sound the falling feet;
And the blue even slowly falls
About the garden trees and walls.

Now in the falling of the gloom
The red fire paints the empty room:
And warmly on the roof it looks,
And flickers on the back of books.

Armies march by tower and spire
Of cities blazing, in the fire;–
Till as I gaze with staring eyes,
The armies fall, the lustre dies.

Then once again the glow returns;
Again the phantom city burns;
And down the red-hot valley, lo!
The phantom armies marching go!

Blinking embers, tell me true
Where are those armies marching to,
And what the burning city is
That crumbles in your furnaces!

Armies in the Fire Robert Louis Stevenson